Behold this day

Behold this day, for it is yours to make.


Quote: Black Elk
Photo: Chris Liu Beers

from Gratefulness.org

A moment of twilight

Twilight has been my favorite time of the day for a long time. I am certain that if it’s caught just right we witness a thinning in the veil between places concrete and divine.

This reflection beautifully describes the experience of twilight.


From Live and Learn – David Kanigan

 

75 minutes before sunrise, I start out in darkness, and slide into Twilight.

90 consecutive days, same loop, 5 miles, Cove Island Park and back.

I had to Google it, because I didn’t know what it was called, the in-between time between night and sunrise.

Twilight: “the soft glowing light from the sky when the sun is below the horizon, caused by the refraction and scattering of the sun’s rays from the atmosphere.”

I have no clue what all that means —  and no interest in learning more.

I’m deep into Kate Zambreno’s new book: Drifts: A Novel. My kind of book. She describes it as “Prose, little things, I stammer out.” (I wish I could stammer, spit and cough out anything close to this.)

Her words: “A shock of color out of nowhere.” And that’s exactly what it was. Look at it. The photo above, taken @ 5:24 a.m

. 24 minutes before sunrise. 24 minutes before sunrise. Where does this light, this ‘shock of color’ come from?

In a different time, a different scene, she goes on to talk about “the light of Vermeer’s paintings. Their silence and mystery…So often the painting seems to be of the same room, at the same picture window… whether the sun floods in directly or diffusely.”

And so here we are. 90 consecutive days on this same walk. The same room, the same picture window, a new Vermeer each morning.

I tuck my camera into my bag, and head home. I twist in my earbuds and listen to Audible pumping in the narration.  She closes out her book on an Albrecht Durer quote, back in the 1500’s (before the internet, before digital cameras):

“What beauty is, I know not, though it adheres to many things.”

And so it does Albrecht, so it does.


Notes:

  • Photo: 5:20 a.m. The Cove, Stamford, CT. July 30, 2020.
  • Inspired by: “The universe is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper.” ~ Eden Phillpotts, from “A Shadow Passes
  • Book Review of Kate Zambreno’s book “Drifts: A Novel”: “Locked in a Creative Struggle, With Rilke as Her Guide” by Catherine Lacey, NY Times

a morning dawns- slow and easy

And come the dawn,
how slow and easy the Sun-beams
Long legs of a great crab,
move through the sea of mist.

 

~ Takarai Kikaku (1661-1707), Haiku in Mad in Translation by Robin D. Gill


thank you, David Kanigan
Photo: 6:06 am. 60° F. Low tide. Weed Ave Stamford, CT.

In awe of all that surrounds us…

Mysteries, Yes

Truly, we live with mysteries too marvelous to be understood.
How grass can be nourishing in the
mouths of the lambs.
How rivers and stones are forever
in allegiance with gravity
while we ourselves dream of rising.

How two hands touch and the bonds will never be broken.
How people come, from delight or the scars of damage,
to the comfort of a poem.

Let me keep my distance, always, from those
who think they have the answers.
Let me keep company always with those who say
“Look!” and laugh in astonishment,
and bow their heads.


It is easy to be distracted – by life and all of its busy ways. Capturing moments of awe and wonder can be difficult, as we so often hear words discouraging the need for such time. Words that insist we only look in the directions guided by others.

These demands leave a restless and hungry spirit. A spirit longing to explore without direction. Wander into places where there is no need for answers. Wander long enough to appreciate the miracle of creation in detail.

Like prayer, these moments away from the directed path of life are found with intention. It is not the amount of time given, five minutes is as good as one hour. This time is calm for the soul —

— calm much needed for balance in this world which spins faster each day.


Quote: Mary Oliver

Happy…

 

 

Only one thing made him happy

and now that it was gone

everything made him happy.

 


Quote: Leonard Cohen